Cliff's Notes

The Business of Dentistry

Dental Instruments, Do’s & Don’ts

Cliff’s Notes for February 28, 2010
So Much More Than Just Dental Supplies
…..E-Blast…..

Cliff Marsh, Henry Schein ……Cell: 201-321-7494……Fax: 201-262-2210…..E-mail cliff.marsh@henryschein.com
http://www.cliffsnotesblog.wordpress.com

“Innovation is the ability to see change as an opportunity – not a threat”
Albert Einstein

In This Week’s Issue:
• Dental Instruments Are Expensive, Care for Them & They will last for Years!
• Defense Wins Games – The Light at the End of the Tunnel May be an On-Coming Train!
• The Arestin Rx Program is a success!
• When the Snow Fell – Did you Worry About Production?

Dental Instruments Are Expensive!…………………………………………………………………………………………………….
Like fine clothing, jewelry or high-speed handpieces ¬ your instruments may also require special care. Although stainless steel instruments, including XP, have outstanding built-in corrosion resistance, incompatibilities do exist with specific chemicals which should be avoided.
Instruments should not be in contact with the following chemicals for more than approximately two hours (then immediately and thoroughly rinsed and dried): aluminum chloride, barium chloride, mercury dichloride, calcium chloride, carbolic acid, citric acid, cresol, mercury chloride, mercury salts, phenol, permanganic acid potash, potassium thicyanate, ferrous chloride, stanniferous chloride, tartaric acid.
The following chemicals should be avoided completely: Aqua Regia, iron chloride, sulphuric & hydrochloric acid, and iodine.

Correct disinfection, care and sterilization
Sterilization cannot be a substitute for cleaning! An instrument exposed to high temperatures before being properly cleaned and rinsed, can cause the initiation of permanent stains onto the instrument surface.
Stubborn impurities and debris should be removed with a soft brush (never with steel wool, drill brushes or abrasive items). The instrument should be rinsed in distilled water (not tap water). Some dental surgeries incorporate ultrasonic units or thermo-disinfectors within their cleaning systems, where extreme care is also required to ensure that the cleaning agents and chemicals being used do not damage the instrument subsurface. These methods clean but do not sterilize!

Dos and don’ts
Regardless of sterilization method, always inspect your equipment for remaining debris and organic or mineral deposits. These can be transferred to the instruments and potentially cause corrosion.
Do not batch stainless steel, aluminum, brass or copper instruments together during the cleaning or sterilization processes. If batched together, a potential for electrolysis reactions between dissimilar metals will exist, which can produce etching and corrosion on the instrument surfaces.
Use only distilled or de-mineralized water when caring for dental instruments. High mineral levels in the water, or water that is too soft, can cause permanent stains on the instrument surface.
Whether you use autoclave or germicidal solvents, always follow the manufacturer’s instructions precisely, regarding specific recommendations for temperatures and times.
Careful drying of instruments during cleaning and sterilizing processes is extremely important. Any remaining water or condensation can cause potential rust or corrosion on the instrument surface and into the substrate. This is particularly important when the pouch-sterilized process is used or when the autoclave has been opened prematurely. It is advisable to remove any remaining moisture with a sterile cloth.
Identification or engraving added to the instrument surface by the end-user is discouraged. When the polished surface is compromised, a potential inroad for oxidation and/or corrosion is created. ‘Slip-on’ ID rings is a recommended alternative for custom instrument identification.
With proper care, the longevity and performance of all your professional dental instruments can be extended. I hope that the above has been helpful to you in achieving this goal.

Defense Wins Games – The Light at the End of the Tunnel May be an On-Coming Train!………………………….
Everyone is telling you that the economy will turn around, so you planted your feet, cut expenses and put innovation on hold. However, you need to remember that every action (or in-action) has a reaction. The sad part is that in business, your organization will react to “in-action” at a very slow pace and by the time you are forced into action, it is either to late or very expensive. Several weeks ago, I quoted Rupert Murdock “In this new world, big will not beat small, fast will beat slow”. Change comes at us every day so we need to embrace it, mold it and be pro-active. In business, your organization will react quickly to an “action plan”. That reaction will be measurable and allow you to adjust the plan and avoid “panic mode”.

On January 1, 2015, the Federal Government will enact the “National Health Information Infrastructure. This will affect every part of your practice from scheduling to insurance to technology to your overall standard of care. You will need to up-date software, hardware and implement new procedures and protocols. Up-dated medical history will need to be confirmed through the NHII and many of your liabilities will be exposed due to the availability of information. Healthcare professionals in all specialties, and you are a healthcare specialist, will need to be linked to a national/international central data base.

Start planning today for implementation and compliance. You have 4 years and 10 months. Please don’t wait to get started, it will just be more expensive and stressful. Four years goes buy real fast and the changes you need to make cannot happen overnight. The hardest part of the entire process will be training your staff and getting to the point where the new procedures and management protocol become routine.

15 years ago when the American Clean Water Act was written into law by the U.S Congress, we told you that “Best Practices” was coming. Most practices waited until the last minute to install amalgam separators and comply with all the new regulations. You can’t do that with the NHII!!!! It can’t be fixed with a service call. You need to start now and the best place is the ADA’s web site http://www.ada.org or Google the NHII.

As always, I am available at any time if you should have any questions or concerns, and I am sure there are many. This is something you don’t want to tackle by yourself.

http://www.ada.org/goto/nhii

Arestin Rx……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
Last year OraPharma (div. Johnson & Johnson) started the Arestin Rx Program. One of the reasons was that many dental insurance policies did not cover the cost of the product. The use of Arestin is “good” dentistry, however, the cost to a patient with multiple sites could be expensive. By utilizing a patient prescription plan, CVS Pharmacies will collect the prescription co-pay and OraPharma will deliver the product to your office at no cost to you. It is recommended that you bill the patient for “application” and that can be at your discretion. I have clients charging $5.00-$15.00 depending on the number of sites. In many cases, a patient may be able to avoid perio surgery and elect to re-care every 3 month.

For more information, follow this link.

https://www.myarestin.com/rxaccess/login-register.html

When the Snow Fell, Did You Worry About Production?………………………………………………………………………
I hope not! You can’t fight mother nature. Sometimes “in the greater order of things” we are given an opportunity to reflect on what is really important. Throughout my career, I have become friendly with many industry leaders in manufacturing and distribution. On Friday, when everyone was snowed in, one of those friends sent me an e-mail with a “feel good” video. It’s the reason most of us do what we do but tend to forget support we were given. Make sure your kids see this one. The fast pace of their world will tend to cloud their memories. I can’t wait to see how my 15 year old daughter reacts, if she opens the e-mail.

Today is Sunday, February 28th …………………………………………………………………………………..
This morning when I walked outside at about 6:00, the birds were singing and I noticed that my Japanese Maple is starting to bd. Spring is on the way. Enjoy the day and please be safe.

Cliff Marsh
Henry Schein Dental
P.O. Box 663, 45 Rt. 46 East, Suite 605
Pine Brook, NJ 07058
tel. 201-321-7494
fax.201-262-2210
e-mail. cliff.marsh@henryschein.com
http://www.cliffsnotesblog.wordpress.com

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February 28, 2010 - Posted by | 1

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